• Tue. May 21st, 2024

Charles Bronson could be free from prison in months as he confirms in letter to his ‘long lost son’

Bynewsmagzines

Feb 7, 2023
Charles Bronson, 70, wrote that his historic public parole hearing has been set for March 6, although this has not yet been officially confirmed

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Britain’s ‘most dangerous prisoner’ could be out in just months as a date for his historic parole hearing may have been set.

The parole board confirmed that notorious criminal Charles Bronson, 70, will have a public hearing on March 6 and March 8 and could be released by the panel. 

Bronson was the first prisoner to formally request a public parole hearing under new rules. 

In a letter to his ‘long-lost son’, Bronson, who calls himself Charles Salvador after the artist Salvador Dali, wrote he hoped to live out his life in a caravan in Devon. 

He has been fundraising for his mobile home and recounted a memory of being released in the 1980s with no money to encourage donations. 

Charles Bronson, 70, wrote that his historic public parole hearing has been set for March 6, although this has not yet been officially confirmed

Charles Bronson, 70, wrote that his historic public parole hearing has been set for March 6, although this has not yet been officially confirmed

Charles Bronson, 70, wrote that his historic public parole hearing has been set for March 6, although this has not yet been officially confirmed

The letter, which was sent from HMP Woodville, to his ‘son’, paparazzi photographer George Bamby, lists Bronson’s desires for after his release.   

LADbible reported that the criminal wrote: ‘Son, as you can see – 6th March! We’ve been waiting along [sic] time for this. What will be will be now!

‘I’ve worked hard to get a result, I’ve now earned my freedom or at least some serious progression. Keep the faith George, I’m coming home.’

He added that if efforts to secure a caravan are successful, it should be used to give children free holidays until he needs it. 

‘If you sort the caravan now, until I move in use it for families with kids who need a holiday, free. It’s been tough times for kids this last few years, so let’s do some good with it.’

The parole board confirmed that his hearing was set for March 6 and March 8, and that the panel would ‘carefully examine a huge range of evidence, including details of the original crime, and any evidence of behaviour change, as well as explore the harm done and impact the crime has had on the victims’. 

The prisoner has been fundraising for his mobile home and has managed to hit £3,129. 

The JustGiving page reads: ‘Charlie’s dream is to live in a caravan on a caravan site in Devon when he is released, where he can live a quiet life and do his artwork and live out the rest of his days as a pensioner.’

The fundraiser continues to argue that the prisoner is no longer violent and deserves a peaceful retirement.  

‘A message from Charlie himself: “God bless you all. It’s about time a few people helped me for a change. I’m looking forward to catching up with you all down the pub when I get out”.’ 

In another chilling letter, written to a fan in 2022, Bronson wrote that the first thing he will do if he gains his freedom is have ‘a double bubble proper English fry-up’. 

Then, the criminal claimed, he will ‘go collecting what’s owing me from all the parasites that have sucked off me for four decades’. 

The violent criminal ended the letter, published in The Sun, with a frightening: ‘Should be fun! Be lucky.’

In a letter penned earlier this month to a fan, Bronson said he would 'go collecting what's owing me' on his release and said the first thing he would enjoy was a 'proper' fry-up

In a letter penned earlier this month to a fan, Bronson said he would 'go collecting what's owing me' on his release and said the first thing he would enjoy was a 'proper' fry-up

In the letter, addressed to a fan, Bronson said he would ‘go collecting what’s owing me’ on his release from prison. He also said the first thing he would do would be to have a ‘proper’ fry-up

Bronson, pictured in said in his latest letter that he's 'given years of good behaviour and they've given me nothing back'

Bronson, pictured in said in his latest letter that he's 'given years of good behaviour and they've given me nothing back'

The notorious criminal made the threat in a letter to a fan despite being awarded a public parole hearing. An application was made by lawyers for Bronson – one of the UK’s longest-serving prisoners – to request his latest case review is heard in public after the law changed earlier this year

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador in honour of the artist Salvador Dalí, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974, but during his time inside he has taken hostages in 10 prison sieges, attacked at least 20 prison officers and caused £500,000 in damage in rooftop protests.

He has been moved prisons more than 120 times during his 43-year spell behind bars – much of which has been in solitary confinement. 

He previously said he was first sent to prison in 1968 and has held 11 hostages in nine different sieges. 

Bronson was sentenced to a discretionary life term with a minimum of four years in 2000 after taking a prison teacher hostage for 44 hours in HMP Hull.  

Other victims have included governors, doctors, staff and even his own solicitor. 

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974 

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974. Pictured: On his way to a parole hearing at the Old Bailey in 2004

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974. Pictured: On his way to a parole hearing at the Old Bailey in 2004

Bronson, who has changed his name to Salvador, was first locked up for armed robbery in 1974. Pictured: On his way to a parole hearing at the Old Bailey in 2004

Tom Hardy (pictured) played the hardman in the 2008 biopic Bronson, which is loosely based on the prisoner's life

Tom Hardy (pictured) played the hardman in the 2008 biopic Bronson, which is loosely based on the prisoner's life

Tom Hardy (pictured) played the hardman in the 2008 biopic Bronson, which is loosely based on the prisoner’s life

It has been more than 30 years since the prisoner’s last stretch as a free man. 

Tom Hardy played the hardman in the 2008 biopic Bronson, which is loosely based on the prisoner’s life.

Bronson, who in the late eighties began a bare knuckle-boxing career in London’s East, recently said he’s still able to do ’95 press-ups in 30 seconds’ and exercises regularly. 

‘When I go out on the yard that’s my hour of freedom. I’ve got a big smile, I’m happy. I’m walking out as fit as the day I came in. I’m coming home,’ he added.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk

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