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How long you have to wait to have a new car delivered revealed

Bynewsmagzines

Mar 11, 2023
Alfa Romeo says the projected lead times on new factory orders is between 17 and 25 weeks. This includes the Giulia saloon, pictured


If you’ve tried to buy a new car in the last three years you will know better than anyone the enormous delays between placing an order and getting your hands on the keys.

A shortage of vehicle components – primarily semiconductor microchips – and wider supply chain issues since the pandemic have severely restricted new car outputs. This has resulted in a logjam for deliveries and seen order books filling and almost bursting at the seams as some brand have quoted lead times as long as two years!

However, latest car industry data published this week suggests supply problems are easing and manufacturers are seeing a return to normal output levels.

But does that mean you can get a brand new car within months of ordering one today? 

With the 23-plate arriving this month and March traditionally being one of the busiest for car showrooms, we’ve spoken to every mainstream brand to find out the current situation with delivery delays on their model ranges.

ALFA ROMEO

Alfa Romeo says the projected lead times on new factory orders is between 17 and 25 weeks. This includes the Giulia saloon, pictured

Alfa Romeo says the projected lead times on new factory orders is between 17 and 25 weeks. This includes the Giulia saloon, pictured

Alfa Romeo’s current car range consists of the Giulia saloon and two SUVs – the new Tonale and larger Stelvio.

It says the full range is available to order from the factory with projected lead times of between 17 and 25 weeks.

The Italian brand adds that franchised retailers will have models in stock and may have some vehicles on order that are likely to be delivered within a month of visiting dealerships.

ALPINE

Alpine - the sportscar subsidiary of Renault - has only one model, the A110. Average delivery delays on new orders across all specifications is seven months

Alpine - the sportscar subsidiary of Renault - has only one model, the A110. Average delivery delays on new orders across all specifications is seven months

Alpine – the sportscar subsidiary of Renault – has only one model, the A110. Average delivery delays on new orders across all specifications is seven months

French sportscar brand Alpine currently sells just one model, the A110 in various guises.

The Renault sister company told us that the average waiting time for new orders is seven months depending on which version of the A110 buyers want. 

The A110R has the longest waits of one year, it says. 

AUDI

Audi wouldn't confirm the average lead time on new factory orders, but did say that it is expecting an undersupply of components that will likely cause long delivery delays. One model that will need to be ordered soon is the TT (pictured), which will cease production entirely in 2023

Audi wouldn't confirm the average lead time on new factory orders, but did say that it is expecting an undersupply of components that will likely cause long delivery delays. One model that will need to be ordered soon is the TT (pictured), which will cease production entirely in 2023

Audi wouldn’t confirm the average lead time on new factory orders, but did say that it is expecting an undersupply of components that will likely cause long delivery delays. One model that will need to be ordered soon is the TT (pictured), which will cease production entirely in 2023

Audi is Britain’s third most popular car brand, based on 2022’s full year sales chart. The German outfit shifted a total of 110,144 models in the UK last year, only bettered by Volkswagen and Ford.

A spokesperson for Audi said all its retailers have cars available for ‘immediate delivery’, though this is specifically only vehicles they have in stock.

However, customers are told to contact their dealers directly to get more information on lead times for factory orders. 

The spokesperson added that while the current supply situation with semiconductors ‘will continue to ease in 2023’ the brand expects to see a ‘structural undersupply’ that will almost certainly restrict outputs.

As part of the huge VW Group, Audi is included in a ‘cross-brand semiconductor strategy’ to help mediate the impact of the lack of supply of chips to ensure production volumes can remain as high as possible to appease demand. 

Despite not sharing information with us, Audi dealers have told Electrifying.com this week about lead times on battery models. The Q8 e-tron can be delivered in five months, while the e-tron GT model has a six month delay. The smallest – and least expensive – EV SUV is the Q4 e-tron, which has an 18-month delivery backlog. 

One model that will soon not be available to order is the TT sportscar. That’s because Audi has confirmed production will cease in 2023. 

BMW

BMW says average lead times on factory orders across the range is an average of four months. However, if customers are buying a PHEV or EV (like the i7 pictured), then should expect delivery times to be longer

BMW says average lead times on factory orders across the range is an average of four months. However, if customers are buying a PHEV or EV (like the i7 pictured), then should expect delivery times to be longer

BMW says average lead times on factory orders across the range is an average of four months. However, if customers are buying a PHEV or EV (like the i7 pictured), then should expect delivery times to be longer

BMW, the fourth most popular car brand in Britain – just behind Audi – with 108,624 sales in 2022, says the average lead time on ‘built-to-order’ cars is approximately four months.

However, a spokesperson said this can ‘vary by model and retailer’, so customers should speak to their local dealer to find out the situation where they live.

‘Please bear in mind that some BMW models require a transit time of two to eight weeks, which is included in this timeframe,’ they added. 

BMW says it is expecting ‘exceptionally strong demand’ for plug-in hybrid and fully electric models in 2023, and as a result waiting times for these vehicles will very likely exceed the average four-month wait time.

Orders placed on battery models including the i4, iX1, iX3 and flagship iX SUV are due to arrive in five months, according to Electrifying.com.

CITROEN

Citroen is quoting lead times of between 2-6 months as it stands. The longest wait is for the C5 X (pictured), due to extended shipment times due to it being manufactured in China

Citroen is quoting lead times of between 2-6 months as it stands. The longest wait is for the C5 X (pictured), due to extended shipment times due to it being manufactured in China

Citroen is quoting lead times of between 2-6 months as it stands. The longest wait is for the C5 X (pictured), due to extended shipment times due to it being manufactured in China

Citroen says the current lead times across its entire range of passenger cars is between two and six months.

The C3 Aircross crossover has the shortest ‘factory-order’ delivery time of just two months. This is because production is being ramped up this month ready for April customer delivery. The electric e-C4 has a waiting time of 12 weeks and e-Berlingo MPV six months, according to a separate report sent to This is Money.

Its C5 X is the model with the longest lead times of six months. Production is scheduled from May but UK orders will take longer as the vehicle is manufactured at its plant in China, meaning extended shipment times.

DACIA

Dacia says the average waiting time for new models is between 2 and 3 months, with the Sandero available within six weeks. The longest lead time is on the Jogger Hybrid (pictured) - customers will have to wait up to 6 months for one

Dacia says the average waiting time for new models is between 2 and 3 months, with the Sandero available within six weeks. The longest lead time is on the Jogger Hybrid (pictured) - customers will have to wait up to 6 months for one

Dacia says the average waiting time for new models is between 2 and 3 months, with the Sandero available within six weeks. The longest lead time is on the Jogger Hybrid (pictured) – customers will have to wait up to 6 months for one

The much-loved budget car brand, Dacia, has reasonably short delivery delays on new orders – though this could be partly due to the purposely sparse equipment levels in its vehicles.

The average waiting time for the majority of its cars is two to three months.

The shortest lead time is on the Sandero. Step into a showroom today to order one and it should arrive in a month to six weeks.

The model with the biggest delay is the new Jogger Hybrid seven-seat estate. Customers wanting this practical family motor will need to kick their heels for up to six months.

DS

Make a factory order for a DS model today and it should be available for delivery within 6 to 16 weeks, the French brand says

Make a factory order for a DS model today and it should be available for delivery within 6 to 16 weeks, the French brand says

Make a factory order for a DS model today and it should be available for delivery within 6 to 16 weeks, the French brand says

DS Automobiles is the luxury arm of Citroen and falls within the wider Stellantis group. It currently has four models in the range: DS3, DS4, DS7 and DS9.

The lead time for new factory orders is between six and 16 weeks, the brand says. The electric DS 3 E-Tense currently has a five-month delivery time, dealers have told Electrifying.com.

A spokesperson told us that its franchised retailer network will have models in stock and may have some vehicles on order that are likely to be delivered within a month. 

FIAT/ABARTH

The shortest waiting time for a new Fiat is 11 to 21 weeks for an electric 500 (pictured). However, the average lead time across all models is 17 weeks

The shortest waiting time for a new Fiat is 11 to 21 weeks for an electric 500 (pictured). However, the average lead time across all models is 17 weeks

The shortest waiting time for a new Fiat is 11 to 21 weeks for an electric 500 (pictured). However, the average lead time across all models is 17 weeks

Fiat says the current lead time on a new order placed in showrooms today is an average of 17 weeks.

The shortest period to wait is 11 to 21 weeks for a new electric 500, which is the Italian company’s major model in its shrinking line-up.

The Fiat with the longest delay is the Tipo hatchback. If you order one now it won’t be turning up for 23 to 35 weeks – that’s five to eight months.

As for its Abarth performance brand, the average wait time for these souped-up models is 16 to 26 weeks.

Fiat says there isn’t one car in its range that can be delivered within one month of a factory order being made, though dealers will have stock of zero-mile vehicles that will be a near match to a preferred specification. 

FORD

The average lead time on a new Ford is 24 to 30 weeks, the brand says. For the Fiesta, it is only 10 weeks. However, production is ceasing for good in a few months, so anyone interested in buying the popular small car need to act fast

The average lead time on a new Ford is 24 to 30 weeks, the brand says. For the Fiesta, it is only 10 weeks. However, production is ceasing for good in a few months, so anyone interested in buying the popular small car need to act fast

The average lead time on a new Ford is 24 to 30 weeks, the brand says. For the Fiesta, it is only 10 weeks. However, production is ceasing for good in a few months, so anyone interested in buying the popular small car need to act fast

Ford has been Britain’s favourite car brand for years. However, that’s not quite the case at the moment. In 2022, its 126,826 sales fell short of Volkswagen, though it still remains the nation’s second biggest players in terms of showroom footfall.

When we asked Ford what the average delivery lead time was across its range, it said between 25 to 30 weeks.

The longest delays are on the low-production Tourneo Connect MPV (63 weeks) and the electric Mustang Mach-E (41 weeks).

For customers looking for a shorter turnaround, the quickest factory order to arrive is the petrol Kuga SUV, taking just 12 weeks. A plug-in hybrid version (Kuga PHEV) takes just 14 weeks.

As for the Fiesta – the UK’s best-selling car for well over a decade up until 2021 – the lead time is 10 weeks. 

Buyers need to bear in mind that Ford has confirmed the Fiesta will cease production from June this year, so you’ll need to put a deposit down soon to get your hands on one.

HONDA

Honda hasn't provided specific details about lead times on models. A spokesperson said customers should 'check with their dealers' for delivery waiting times

Honda hasn't provided specific details about lead times on models. A spokesperson said customers should 'check with their dealers' for delivery waiting times

Honda hasn’t provided specific details about lead times on models. A spokesperson said customers should ‘check with their dealers’ for delivery waiting times

Honda wasn’t very forthcoming with details about the lead times for factory orders of its current new car line-up.

A spokesperson told us: ‘Lead times for new cars vary across model and derivatives. We are keeping our dealers updated and we therefore advise customers to check with their dealers for lead time information. 

‘Some vehicles are currently available immediately, while others have several months lead time.’

HYUNDAI

Hyundai was another brand that refused to provide specific information regarding lead times on new orders. It recommended customers discuss this with their local dealer

Hyundai was another brand that refused to provide specific information regarding lead times on new orders. It recommended customers discuss this with their local dealer

Hyundai was another brand that refused to provide specific information regarding lead times on new orders. It recommended customers discuss this with their local dealer

Like with Honda, we couldn’t squeeze much information about delivery times out of Korean car brand, Hyundai.

When we contacted the manufacturer, a spokesperson told us: ‘Whilst supply lead times continue to improve specific lead times will vary significantly from both a model, derivative and specification level. 

‘We would advise customers to speak to their local retailer who will be able to advise them on their specific requirements and may be able to also offer alternatives for shorter delivery.’

Dealers contacted by Electrifying,com this month said there are seven month lead times on Ioniq 5 and Ioniq 6 EVs, though depending on spec they can extend to a year. It has also stopped taking new factory orders for the Kona Electric.

JAGUAR

Customers placing an order for a factory-built Jaguar today can expect their new car to arrive anytime between a matter of months and up to a year

Customers placing an order for a factory-built Jaguar today can expect their new car to arrive anytime between a matter of months and up to a year

Customers placing an order for a factory-built Jaguar today can expect their new car to arrive anytime between a matter of months and up to a year

A spokesperson for Jaguar said: ‘Due to the nature of the semiconductor use in our product, lead times vary by model.’

With the British marque set to embark on becoming an electric-only brand from 2025, it is already planning to wind-up production of some of its combustion-engine models. This includes the F-Type, which will stop being built this year, bringing to a close a 75-year bloodline of petrol-powered sportscars. Order one now and it should come within six months.

Customers placing orders across the range can expect delays ranging from six to nine months. 

The earliest available is – surprisingly – the electric I-Pace, with a lead time of up to six months. 

For an F-Pace, the delay between ordering a factory model and delivery is six to nine months, while the smaller E-Pace SUV takes longer – nine to 12 months. The XE and XF saloon models are also six to nine months after orders are placed.

JEEP

Jeep says the average lead time on new cars is 23 weeks. The model with the shortest waiting time from order to delivery is the Compass SUV (pictured)

Jeep says the average lead time on new cars is 23 weeks. The model with the shortest waiting time from order to delivery is the Compass SUV (pictured)

Jeep says the average lead time on new cars is 23 weeks. The model with the shortest waiting time from order to delivery is the Compass SUV (pictured)

Jeep isn’t one of the biggest car brands in terms of sales in Britain. In fact, it shifted only 2,525 new models in the UK in the entirety of 2022. However, for customers who want one of these US motors, the average lead time on one is 23 weeks.

The shortest wait is 19 weeks for versions of the Compass SUV.

A spokesperson said no factory orders across its line-up of five models will be delivered within a month of being placed, though retailers do have zero-mile cars in stock. 

KIA

The median lead time across all Kia models today is 12 to 15 weeks. However, some examples - like the Stonic crossover pictured - can be with customers within a fortnight

The median lead time across all Kia models today is 12 to 15 weeks. However, some examples - like the Stonic crossover pictured - can be with customers within a fortnight

The median lead time across all Kia models today is 12 to 15 weeks. However, some examples – like the Stonic crossover pictured – can be with customers within a fortnight

Kia has become a major up and comer in the UK in recent years. With 100,191 sales last year, it was the sixth most popular car brand for new orders in 2022 (behind VW, Ford, Audi, BMW and Toyota).

A spokesperson for the Korean car firm told us that the average lead time on new orders is 12 to 15 weeks, though there are huge differences depending on which model you want.

For instance, a Stonic crossover (in ‘Quantum’ special edition spec) can arrive within two weeks, while a Niro Plug-in Hybrid ordered today won’t be delivered until late 2023 or even early next year. That said, the fully-electric Niro EV and conventional Niro Hybrid are available sooner (EV arriving between 15 to 19 weeks and Hybrid is 24 weeks).

Orders of the EV6 electric model will not arrive for eight to 12 months, but the Soul EV can be delivered to customers from the factory in three to four months, it told other sources.

The XCeed GT-Line S is the only other model in its range that can be delivered following factory order in around one month (four to six weeks).

LAND ROVER

Land Rover lead times are among the longest of any brand here, with many of its variants subject to delivery periods exceeding 12 months. This includes the Defender 4X4 (pictured)

Land Rover lead times are among the longest of any brand here, with many of its variants subject to delivery periods exceeding 12 months. This includes the Defender 4X4 (pictured)

Land Rover lead times are among the longest of any brand here, with many of its variants subject to delivery periods exceeding 12 months. This includes the Defender 4X4 (pictured)

Jaguar’s sister brand Land Rover provided us with the same comment when we approached the car firm about lead times on new orders: ‘Due to the nature of the semiconductor use in our product, lead times vary by model.’

When checking each model, we found that the delivery delays on a new Range Rover can be in excess of a year, with the earliest availability in nine months – that’s bordering on 2024. The Range Rover Sport is a similar story, with delays of between six months and over one year, the brand quotes.

The Defender is another model with varying delays, in many cases over 12 months, Land Rover’s website states. 

As for the smaller Evoque, an R-Dynamic PHEV version can arrive in weeks to six months, while others are delayed back to at least March 2024. 

And some versions of its cars are not available to order at all.

LEXUS

A spokesperson on behalf of Lexus told us that customers needs to contact their dealers to find out more detailed estimations for lead times on new orders

A spokesperson on behalf of Lexus told us that customers needs to contact their dealers to find out more detailed estimations for lead times on new orders

A spokesperson on behalf of Lexus told us that customers needs to contact their dealers to find out more detailed estimations for lead times on new orders

With 10,675 car sales in total in 2022, Lexus is ‘t one of the big players in the UK market, but it’s certainly not the smallest.

When we approached the Japanese firm for comment regarding delivery delay periods, a spokesperson on behalf of Lexus told us lead times are ‘fluid’ and ‘timings can change regularly’. 

They added: ‘Our dealers undertake regular communication programmes to update customers on their orders.’

Lexus dealers have told Electrifying.com this month that UX300e electric SUV orders can’t be collected by owners for up to five months. 

MAZDA

Want a brand new Mazda? The average wait for delivery on new orders is between 12 to 16 weeks, though retailers have stock of all cars across the model range in March, the Japanese brand says

Want a brand new Mazda? The average wait for delivery on new orders is between 12 to 16 weeks, though retailers have stock of all cars across the model range in March, the Japanese brand says

Want a brand new Mazda? The average wait for delivery on new orders is between 12 to 16 weeks, though retailers have stock of all cars across the model range in March, the Japanese brand says

Mazda gave This is Money a detailed review of where it currently stands in terms of lead times on new cars.

For customers wanting a vehicle immediately, it says it has stock across all model lines available at dealers.

For those who want to make a specific factory order, the average wait for delivery is 12 to 16 weeks, which is primarily due to Mazda building all their models in Japan.

A spokesperson for the brand told us that dealers have stock of CX-30, CX-5 and CX-60 range in preparation for the rise in demand expected this month.

MERCEDES-BENZ

A Mercedes spokesperson told us that the majority of its customers buy cars from existing stock listed on its website. For this reason it did not disclose lead times on factory orders

A Mercedes spokesperson told us that the majority of its customers buy cars from existing stock listed on its website. For this reason it did not disclose lead times on factory orders

A Mercedes spokesperson told us that the majority of its customers buy cars from existing stock listed on its website. For this reason it did not disclose lead times on factory orders

Another car maker not willing to divulge its average lead times on new factory orders is Mercedes.

Britain’s eighth biggest vehicle seller in 2022 failed to provide us with information regarding delivery estimations across its line-up or for specific in-demand models. 

It claims the majority of its customers purchase from available UK stock via the Online Showroom at shop.mercedes-benz.co.uk. 

‘These vehicles are available to purchase now, and can be reserved online. Customers can filter results by specific preferences including; budget, powertrain (including the latest electric and plug-in hybrid models from our Mercedes-EQ range) and new or used.’

For a luxury brand with an almost unlimited number of options per model ordered, it’s surprising that more of its customers don’t want to make specific requests for their new cars. However, Mercedes is one of the brands offering a raft of paywall features that are fitted to their vehicles as standard but require additional payment – or a monthly subscription – to access them. 

BMW provides a similar service, which we covered extensively in 2022. 

MG

Lead times on MG's range of 'affordable' electric vehicles is anything between three months and a year and a half. The MG4 EV pictured - which is its latest model - will arrive with customers within six months of orders being placed

Lead times on MG's range of 'affordable' electric vehicles is anything between three months and a year and a half. The MG4 EV pictured - which is its latest model - will arrive with customers within six months of orders being placed

Lead times on MG’s range of ‘affordable’ electric vehicles is anything between three months and a year and a half. The MG4 EV pictured – which is its latest model – will arrive with customers within six months of orders being placed

MG grabbed headlines in January when its HS SUV topped the monthly car sales chart for the first time in the Chinese-owned brand’s history.

The brand is aimed at the lower end of the market, and its electric cars are among the cheapest on sale in Britain right now. But these are subject to long lead times, according to a report by Electrifying.com.

The earliest arriving will be the MG 5 EV, taking just three months and a new sub-£30,000 MG4 EV ordered today won’t arrive for four to six months.

Such was the level of demand for the MG ZS EV – its only electric SUV offering – last year that dealers ceased taking orders for the car. Now, it says the lead time is between 12 and 18 months.

Across the full model range, an MG spokesperson told us the average lead time in factory orders is approximately 12 to 16 weeks. 

MINI

Mini told us the average lead time on new orders is 4 months, though the Mini Electric hatch will likely take longer than that

Mini told us the average lead time on new orders is 4 months, though the Mini Electric hatch will likely take longer than that

Mini told us the average lead time on new orders is 4 months, though the Mini Electric hatch will likely take longer than that

Mini told us the average lead time on built-to-order cars for retail customers is approximately four months, although this will vary by model and retailer. 

‘Individual Mini retailers are best placed to answer customer questions relating to lead times,’ a brand spokesperson said. 

They added that plug-in hybrid Minis and the electric Hatchback are subject to the longest delays in terms of deliveries, though dealers said the EV model can be delivered in four months also.

NISSAN

The Nissans with the shortest delivery times are those that are built in the UK, including the Qashqai, Leaf EV and Juke. The new X-Trail SUV (pictured) is subject to lead times as short as 4 months, the Japanese company told us

The Nissans with the shortest delivery times are those that are built in the UK, including the Qashqai, Leaf EV and Juke. The new X-Trail SUV (pictured) is subject to lead times as short as 4 months, the Japanese company told us

The Nissans with the shortest delivery times are those that are built in the UK, including the Qashqai, Leaf EV and Juke. The new X-Trail SUV (pictured) is subject to lead times as short as 4 months, the Japanese company told us

When we contacted a spokesperson for Nissan in relation to delivery delays on new orders, they told us: ‘Lead times for new Nissan models vary depending on chosen model and trim, with some vehicles available immediately from UK stock – for example Juke DIG-T 114 N-Connecta, Qashqai e-Power N-Connecta and Leaf 39kWh Tekna.’

The shortest waits are for the three cars currently produced in the UK at the Sunderland plant. All variants of the Qashqai – Britain’s best-selling new car in 2022 – and Leaf can be delivered in under four months, while Juke models are available within six months.

For non-UK built models, Ariya delivery is currently sitting between four and six months, while the newly launched X-Trail is available in as little as four months, dependent on trim level.

PEUGEOT

The shortest lead time on any Peugeot model is the extremely popular 208 supermini (pictured). Factory orders are expected to be with customers in around 2 months. However, some other models on the line-up have longer waits of up to 8 months

The shortest lead time on any Peugeot model is the extremely popular 208 supermini (pictured). Factory orders are expected to be with customers in around 2 months. However, some other models on the line-up have longer waits of up to 8 months

The shortest lead time on any Peugeot model is the extremely popular 208 supermini (pictured). Factory orders are expected to be with customers in around 2 months. However, some other models on the line-up have longer waits of up to 8 months

The current lead time across Peugeot’s entire passenger car range is two to eight months.

The French firm’s popular 208 has the shortest delivery time of only two months, which is due to it being on March production for April customer delivery. The electric e-208 will take longer at three to four months, as is the case for the e-2008.

The Peugeot 508 has the longest lead times at eight months, a brand spokesperson said.

POLESTAR

Polestar told us it is currently taking factory orders for the updated '2' model, which is a 2024 variant. For this reason, first deliveries aren't due to arrive until August

Polestar told us it is currently taking factory orders for the updated '2' model, which is a 2024 variant. For this reason, first deliveries aren't due to arrive until August

Polestar told us it is currently taking factory orders for the updated ‘2’ model, which is a 2024 variant. For this reason, first deliveries aren’t due to arrive until August

Polestar, the electric spin-off of Volvo, told us that its new orders for Polestar2 will be its refreshed 2024 version, which comes with a bigger battery, more range and faster charging.

For this reason, it says customers would be looking at August for first deliveries in the UK – that’s five months away.

‘Our selection of pre-owned Polestars are ready and available for immediate delivery and pre-configured cars are new vehicles that are available for delivery between one to four months,’ a spokesperson told us.

PORSCHE

Porsche says we should direct potential customers to its in-house sales teams to discuss lead times across all models, including the electric Taycan range (pictured)

Porsche says we should direct potential customers to its in-house sales teams to discuss lead times across all models, including the electric Taycan range (pictured)

Porsche says we should direct potential customers to its in-house sales teams to discuss lead times across all models, including the electric Taycan range (pictured)

Luxury sports car maker Porsche provided us with a fairly vague outlook for lead times on orders.

‘Every Porsche model is unique, with thousands of individually configurable options. A statement of average waiting time is therefore of little relevance to customers,’ a spokesperson told us.

Dealers have told Electrifying.com that orders placed for the electric Taycan and Taycan Cross-Turismo estate are backed up for up to 12 months.

They are instead directing buyers to its Porsche Centre sales teams, which it says are ‘best placed to help customers understand potential lead times for all models’.

RENAULT

Renault says the average waiting time for new orders to be delivered is four to eight weeks. For the electric Megane E-Tech, customers can get their hands on the keys almost within a month

Renault says the average waiting time for new orders to be delivered is four to eight weeks. For the electric Megane E-Tech, customers can get their hands on the keys almost within a month

Renault says the average waiting time for new orders to be delivered is four to eight weeks. For the electric Megane E-Tech, customers can get their hands on the keys almost within a month

When we contacted Renault, the French manufacturer told us that average waiting time on new orders is now four to eight weeks.

The shortest delay is for the electric Zoe at just one month, while the Megane E-Tech electric and Arkana crossover are also subject to factory-order delivery within around four weeks of orders being placed.

The longest wait for any car in its range is for the Captur E-Tech crossover. This is due to ‘exceptional demand’, which has pushed UK deliveries back to June, meaning lead times of around 12 weeks.

SEAT/CUPRA

Seat and Cupra, like other VW Group brands, would not give specifics in terms of lead times on new orders. Customers need to contact their local dealerships for information

Seat and Cupra, like other VW Group brands, would not give specifics in terms of lead times on new orders. Customers need to contact their local dealerships for information

Seat and Cupra, like other VW Group brands, would not give specifics in terms of lead times on new orders. Customers need to contact their local dealerships for information

Seat and Cupra are part of the VW Group, with a company-wide spokesperson telling us that they are not disclosing lead times by brand due to the difference in expected delivery times across varying models.

While they claim there is stock available for ‘immediate delivery’, that doesn’t necessarily cover the entire model range across both Seat and Cupra brands.

‘In general, the current supply situation with semiconductors will continue to ease in 2023, both in the number of critical semiconductor types and in the quantity available,’ they told us. 

‘Overall, however, we continue to see a structural undersupply of semiconductors this year as well.’

Cupra dealers have told Electrifying.com that delivery delays on the Born electric hatchback is three to six months – that means one will arrive in half the time of the VW ID.3 sister car (read about that below). 

SKODA

Skoda told us the longest lead time on a new factory order is 5 months, though cars like the Scala (pictured) are available in two months

Skoda told us the longest lead time on a new factory order is 5 months, though cars like the Scala (pictured) are available in two months

Skoda told us the longest lead time on a new factory order is 5 months, though cars like the Scala (pictured) are available in two months

While other VW Group brands didn’t want to disclose details of lead times, Skoda has provided us a clear breakdown of what customers can expect when ordering new motors from its dealers.

While it wouldn’t give us an average across the full model line-up, it said the longest wait is for Superb saloons, which are subject to lead times of five months.

On the flipside, the shortest wait for delivery is for the Scala, which can be delivered within two months of orders being placed.

The electric Enyaq iV currently has a lead time of between four and 12 months, according to Skoda dealers. 

A spokesperson for the brand said those looking to get their hands on cars sooner can go to its website to view available stock. These cars can be with owners within one to two weeks.

TESLA

The Tesla Model 3 (pictured) and Model Y are both available for immediate delivery, says the US electric car maker

The Tesla Model 3 (pictured) and Model Y are both available for immediate delivery, says the US electric car maker

The Tesla Model 3 (pictured) and Model Y are both available for immediate delivery, says the US electric car maker

Tesla has twice slashed its prices across the Model 3 and Y already this year – the latest adjustment coming this week with cuts of around 6 per cent, according to some reports.

Could price cuts be down to reduced demand? It certainly seems Tesla has plenty of available stock.

A spokesperson told us that Model 3 and Model Y are available for delivery with immediate effect. 

‘These are the only Tesla models currently on sale in the UK and Ireland, and have the same delivery timeline,’ they said. 

Model X and Model S are not in production today and therefore unavailable to order in the UK.

TOYOTA

Toyota would not explain the lead times currently experienced on new orders. Buyers need to contact their local dealers

Toyota would not explain the lead times currently experienced on new orders. Buyers need to contact their local dealers

Toyota would not explain the lead times currently experienced on new orders. Buyers need to contact their local dealers

Toyota would not give us a clear indication of lead times.

A spokesperson for the brand explained: ‘For Toyota and the case of longest or shortest wait times, the situation is fluid and timings can change regularly. Our dealers undertake regular communication programmes to update customers on their orders.’

Your best option is to contact a local dealer to enquire about factory order delivery times or cars available in stock. 

VAUXHALL

Vauxhall says the average delivery delay on new factory orders is four to six months, though the popular Corsa (pictured) has lead times as short as two to three months

Vauxhall says the average delivery delay on new factory orders is four to six months, though the popular Corsa (pictured) has lead times as short as two to three months

Vauxhall says the average delivery delay on new factory orders is four to six months, though the popular Corsa (pictured) has lead times as short as two to three months

Vauxhall was the seventh most popular car brand in 2022. Some 83,691 motors were bought in its showrooms last year.

A spokesperson for the company told us the current lead times on new factory orders is four to six months, though some models are available sooner.

The longest delay is for the Vivaro Electric Life MPV, with orders placed today not likely to arrive before the end of the year (a nine-month lead time).

However, the brand’s most popular model, the Corsa, and the Crossland crossover are both available with lead times of just two to three months. That’s the same for the electric Corsa-e while the bigger Mokka-e has a five-month wait.

The spokesperson also added that Vauxhall has a ‘few thousand’ cars in stock for immediate delivery in March, so customers should speak to their dealers. 

VOLKSWAGEN

Volkswagen wouldn't give an indication of lead times on new orders, saying they vary across different models. One car that seems to be being delivered rapidly in 2023 is the T-Roc SUV (pictured). After the first two months of the year, it's the second best-selling new motor with 4,616 registrations. Only Vauxhall has sold more Corsas

Volkswagen wouldn't give an indication of lead times on new orders, saying they vary across different models. One car that seems to be being delivered rapidly in 2023 is the T-Roc SUV (pictured). After the first two months of the year, it's the second best-selling new motor with 4,616 registrations. Only Vauxhall has sold more Corsas

Volkswagen wouldn’t give an indication of lead times on new orders, saying they vary across different models. One car that seems to be being delivered rapidly in 2023 is the T-Roc SUV (pictured). After the first two months of the year, it’s the second best-selling new motor with 4,616 registrations. Only Vauxhall has sold more Corsas

If you’ve been reading this feature up until now, you will know that the VW Group is staying tight-lipped on when it expects new factory orders of its cars to be delivered. And that’s the case for Volkswagen, which was Britain’s most popular car brand last year with 131,850 sales.

A spokesperson told us: ‘Due to the wide range of models and supply lines, as well as allowing for the typical lifecycle of cars including new model launch curves, a statement of average waiting time has little relevance.

‘All of our retail partners have cars available for immediate delivery.

‘As always, our sales teams are on hand to work with our customers and advise on specific model availability as well as the opportunity to advise on minor modifications of a specification which may reduce waiting times significantly.’

A report by Electrifying.com (see boxout below) claims lead times for the electric ID.5 SUV are around 12 weeks, but for the more affordable ID.3 hatchback customers are being told it will be another nine months before deliveries arrive.

As for the latest ID.Buzz MPV, orders for single-tone colours are subject to delays of three to six months. If you want the fancier two-tone paint, the delay is a whopping year and a half, dealers claim.

VOLVO

Volvo says factory orders for most of its model range can be delivered within 5 to 10 months. Among the cars with the shortest lead times is the fully-electric XC40 Recharge (pictured)

Volvo says factory orders for most of its model range can be delivered within 5 to 10 months. Among the cars with the shortest lead times is the fully-electric XC40 Recharge (pictured)

Volvo says factory orders for most of its model range can be delivered within 5 to 10 months. Among the cars with the shortest lead times is the fully-electric XC40 Recharge (pictured)

Volvo said the supply of its new cars is a ‘dynamic situation’ and would not set an average waiting time for delivery of orders. However, it said the majority have an estimated delivery between five and 10 months from the date of a new factory order.

The longest delay is for the S60, currently at an estimated 10 to 12 months. The new EX90 won’t be arriving for another 16 to 18 months, but that’s because production hasn’t started yet and won’t until later in 2023.

The shortest lead times are for the pure electric C40 and XC40 Recharge – estimated at five to 10 months. 

The XC60 SUV currently has an estimated lead time of between six and seven months, the Volvo spokesperson added.

They told us: ‘Ordering a car via the Care by Volvo subscription service brings the shortest estimated delivery dates. Certain versions of these models are all currently available with an estimated delivery date of four weeks: C40 Recharge, XC40 Recharge, XC40, XC60, V90 and XC90.’

Average lead time on electric cars falls to 24 weeks 

A report by Electrifying.com revealed the average wait time for a new EV has dropped by 6 weeks in the last 3 months - this is likely due to a rise in production and a fall in demand for electric cars

A report by Electrifying.com revealed the average wait time for a new EV has dropped by 6 weeks in the last 3 months - this is likely due to a rise in production and a fall in demand for electric cars

A report by Electrifying.com revealed the average wait time for a new EV has dropped by 6 weeks in the last 3 months – this is likely due to a rise in production and a fall in demand for electric cars

Drivers wanting to make the switch to electric are seeing lead times decline in recent weeks, likely as a result of a fall in demand for EVs.

Research by Electrifying.com has found that waiting times currently stand at an average of 24 weeks; down six weeks or 13 per cent (from 28 weeks) since the same time in December, and 26 per cent (35 weeks) from the peak in October 2022.

The electric car website says this is ‘due in part to increased stock availability as global supply chains start to ease’ but also says drivers are ‘pressing pause on purchases in the face of higher energy costs and cost of living worries’. 

This was underlined in a recent survey in which one in three (29 per cent) respondents said the squeeze on finances had delayed their decision to buy a new car.

Founder and CEO of Electrifying, Ginny Buckley, said: ‘Shorter waiting times for a new car may seem like a good thing, however delve a little deeper and we can see the underlying reasons are cause for concern. 

‘It seems the soaring cost of living and below par charging infrastructure are both holding consumers back.

‘Demand for smaller, more affordable cars is there – we can see this in recent registration statistics, but we need car manufacturers to keep pace with this trend in their electric offerings; at the moment there are just five electric cars available which are priced under £30,000.’

CARS & MOTORING: ON TEST

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